Fruit of thy Womb

Elizabeth’s famous description of Mary’s son Jesus – “the fruit of thy womb” – very closely matches the Septuagint version of Psalm 132:11. The Lord has sworn to David, A truth from which He will not turn back: “Of the fruit of your body I will set upon your throne.” The word translated “body” in Psalm 132 is the same Greek word (“koilia”) as the word translated “womb” in Luke 1:42. Psalm 132 is a messianic promise and prayer.

Advertisements

Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb. Luke 1:42b KJV

Among the things discovered while looking up other things: Elizabeth’s famous description of Mary’s son Jesus – “the fruit of thy womb” – very closely matches the Septuagint version of Psalm 132:11.

In Greek:

  • ὁ καρπὸς τῆς κοιλίας σου. Luke 1:42
  • ἐκ καρποῦ τῆς κοιλίας σου Psalm 132:11 LXX

In wooden English, that amounts to “[the] fruit of the womb of you”.

The full text of Psalm 132:11 reads,

The Lord has sworn to David
A truth from which He will not turn back:
“Of the fruit of your body I will set upon your throne.”

The word translated “body” in Psalm 132 is the same Greek word (“koilia”) as the word translated “womb” in Luke 1:42. Both translations are within the normal range of meaning for the word.

Psalm 132 is a messianic promise and prayer. It recalls God’s promise to David through the prophet Nathan that one of David’s descendents would reign upon the throne of Israel forever. The Psalmist asks the Lord to remember and continually act upon his promise. How appropriate, then, that Elizabeth’s acclamation uses the words of Psalm 132. Jesus is not only the fruit of Mary’s womb; he is the fruit of David’s seed and the fulfillment of Psalm 132 as well.