The Victory Worth the Sacrifice

What is the most important thing about the victory in WWII at the cost of a million allied combatant lives?

  1. The fact that so many allied soldiers gave their lives touches my heart. It’s a very powerful thing to contemplate.
  2. The tenacity and skill of the allied soldiers show me how to succeed in the face of great difficulties. There are lots of life lessons to be learned.
  3. The allies produced a number of scientific and technological advances that provided the world with many practical advantages, which make my life better. (This computer is the evolution of one of them!)
  4. The allied victory made it possible for me to live in Europe and Korea, which was really cool! I loved the food, the drink and all the sights! Lots of good shopping, too! Yea, allies!
  5. The allied victory freed large parts of the world from brutal dictatorships and deadly oppression, restoring hope for millions. The whole world benefits from their victory.

All are true. Only one is the reason that so many allied service members shed their blood. Only one is commensurate with the scale of the sacrifice.

Now the most important thing about Christ’s victory over sin, death and the devil is ….

Advertisements

A Sower went out to Sow

Matthew 13:1-9

Jesus sat in the boat and looked at the large crowd gathered along the shore. His heart was elated and broken at the same time. The people assembled here were evidence of the Father’s powerful work and the coming of the kingdom Jesus proclaimed. They had seen Jesus’ mighty deeds and heard him teach about the coming kingdom. Now they were moved to follow Jesus – well, at least as far as the edge of town.

Still, Jesus knew that some would really not understand. Some would fall away when persecution raised its ugly head. Still others would be drawn away by the lure of the world’s supposed treasures.

Some of Jesus’ opponents may have even asked Jesus, “Tell us about this kingdom you preach about. If it is so great, why isn’t everyone getting on board? Some of your own disciples are abandoning you!”

Thankfully, Jesus also knew that many of those who followed him would also persevere in faith to inherit the kingdom. It was to this end that Jesus came. Sometimes, Jesus’ message bore fruit in the most unlikely places.

So Jesus told a parable about a farmer who sowed his seeds, knowing that not every seed would produce fruit for the coming harvest. Some seed would be eaten by birds. Some would fall on rocky ground. Some would fall where it would be choked out by weeds. But some would produce a harvest that would bring joy to the farmer’s heart.

Now God isn’t exactly like a farmer sowing seeds. You can only take the analogy so far.

Farmers aren’t invested emotionally in every seed that doesn’t bear fruit. If farmers get a good return on their time, money and effort, that’s certainly enough. But God is not growing soybeans and people aren’t dirt. Every person for whom Jesus died is precious to him, including those who don’t understand him, those who deny him and those who leave him for apparently greener pastures. Every person matters, including those who ultimately fail to enter the kingdom.

To the people on the shore, Jesus’ message was a challenge. What will you do with this Jesus whom you have followed to the shoreline? Will you let his word take root in you and grow?  Unlike soil, human beings are not passive recipients of the sower’s seed.

Surely the kingdom will come whether you or I or the individuals gathered on the shore to hear Jesus speak are there to be a part of it. Jesus’ parable is both a word of warning and encouragement. The kingdom is coming, and those who remain united to Jesus will inherit it. Don’t let the evil one’s threats or the world’s empty promises draw you away.

Related: The Parable of the Sower

 

Charles Wesley and Samuel Seabury’s Plan for Ordaining Methodists in America

As a postscript to my posts on the failed union between Methodists and Anglicans in early American history, I note an article published by catholicity and covenant (“genuine, valid and episcopal”), which in turn quotes an article by Mark Michael at Covenant (“zeal and patience”).

I wrote that Thomas Coke and Francis Asbury rejected a plan to reunite with the remnants of the Church of England in America in 1784, but Coke changed his mind in 1791. Even then, Episcopal bishop William White responded positively to Coke’s initiative, but presiding bishop Samuel Seabury turned a deaf ear.

I was surprised to learn, then, that Seabury and Methodist co-founder Charles Wesley actually met in London in 1784 and created a plan by which Seabury would ordain Methodist preachers when he returned to America. About the same time, Charles’ brother John Wesley made his fateful decision to consecrate Thomas Coke as kind of bishop and to send him to America with the authority to ordain:

***

As [John] Wesley sent off his letter, and Thomas Coke with it to come to America with the purpose of ordaining his preachers, another Anglican priest was also travelling about Britain. Samuel Seabury, bishop-elect of Connecticut, was pursuing a different potential solution to American Anglicanism’s pastoral crisis, one he believed to be essential to “follow[ing] the Scriptures and the Primitive Church.” Seabury was in search of three bishops who would consecrate him, so that episcopacy might be carried back to his native land.

Seabury’s zeal in pursuit of his cause cannot be doubted, but he was above all a patient man. For nearly a year and a half, he met with a number of English bishops to plead his case, some of them multiple times. Like Wesley, he was rather woodenly rebuffed by Robert Lowth, the Bishop of London, who could not imagine the prospect of consecrating a bishop who lacked a warrant from the Connecticut state legislature. . . . .

Seabury’s patience was rewarded when three Scottish bishops consecrated him at Aberdeen on Nov. 14, 1784. Ironically, on exactly the same day, in a Methodist meetinghouse in Delaware, Thomas Coke had his first meeting with Francis Asbury to discuss Wesley’s plan for establishing a Methodist church and ordaining its first ministers. That meeting would set in motion a process that would end in their joint ordination as the first Methodist superintendents (later bishops) at the famous “Christmas Conference” in Baltimore just six weeks later.

It could have been otherwise. Seabury had met with Charles Wesley during his time in London, and he had agreed to ordain Methodist preachers upon his return to America if he found them suitable candidates for the ministry. There’s no evidence that Seabury also met with John Wesley (or that, if he had, Wesley would have trusted that he would find success in his quest). But Charles Wesley found Seabury’s plan quite promising, and would scold his brother’s impatience in a letter to an American priest the following year:

Had they had patience a little longer, they would have seen a Real Primitive Bishop in America duly consecrated by three Scotch Bishops, who had their consecration from the English Bishops, and are acknowledged by them as the same as themselves. There is therefore not the least difference betwixt the members of Bishop Seabury’s Church, and the members of the Church of England.

You know I had the happiness to converse with that truly apostolical man, who is esteemed by all that know him as much as by you and me. He told me he looked upon the Methodists of America as sound members of the Church, and was ready to ordain any of the Preachers whom he should find duly qualified. His ordinations would be indeed genuine, valid and Episcopal. (“Letter to Thomas Bradbury Chandler”)

Read both articles.

We’re Mutts

My recent post on The Election of Second Sons in Genesis (and the postscript on 18th century South Carolina revolutionaries with a chip on their shoulders), reminded me of this scene from Stripes.

Like Bill Murray’s platoon of American soldiers, the church of Jesus Christ is composed of mutts and mutants. We are not by nature heirs of the kingdom and members of his family, but only by the grace of God in Jesus Christ.

Your Son, Your Only Son Whom You Love

Then God said, “Take your son, your only son, whom you love—Isaac—and go to the region of Moriah. Sacrifice him there as a burnt offering on a mountain I will show you.” Genesis 22:2

abraham-isaac

In the story line of the Bible, the sacrifice of Isaac represents a direct threat to God’s covenant promise to Abraham. God had promised Abraham, “It is through Isaac that your offspring will be reckoned.” How can God make Abraham’s descendants a great nation and a blessing to the world if Isaac is dead? I can think of no better answer than the one offered by the author of the New Testament epistle of Hebrews. “Abraham reasoned that God could even raise the dead, and so in a manner of speaking he did receive Isaac back from death.” But while that is how I approach this text theologically, it’s not how I approach it emotionally.

Continue reading “Your Son, Your Only Son Whom You Love”